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Vote for Maryhill in the National Lottery Awards!

We’re delighted to announce that Maryhill Burgh Halls has been shortlisted in this year’s National Lottery Awards in the category of Best Heritage Project.

Click here to vote for us in the Heritage category!
Now we need your help! To get through to the next round, please show your support and consider voting for us – the three projects in each category with the most votes by July 22nd will go through to the final – and be featured on a BBC TV program about the awards.
You can vote for free via the website at www.lotterygoodcauses.org.uk/awards
or by ringing 0844 836 9715 (calls cost just 5p from a BT Landline).
 
If you've enjoyed visiting Halls, have been to an event here, or just like what we've done to bring the buildings back to life, this is a great way to show your support - if you choose to vote for us, Thank You! If not, then please look at the other fantastic projects involved, and vote for one of them instead...
 
Hunter Reid, Project Co-ordinator at Maryhill Burgh Halls Trust, said:  
“Funding from the National Lottery was crucial in allowing us to bring Maryhill Burgh Halls back to life and we’re delighted that the project has now been selected as a semi-finalist in The National Lottery Awards.   The project not only allowed for the restoration and development of these magnificent buildings, but it is also bringing a much loved hub for community activity and celebration back to life! 
 
“We are delighted with the feedback so far from both the local community and also visitors from further afield who are now able to experience the historically rich area of Maryhill.  We hope that they will continue to support us and, of course, vote us Best Heritage Project in The National Lottery Awards!”
 

The Burgh Halls Project
The project has brought three derelict, “at risk”, listed buildings in the heart of one of the most deprived areas in Scotland back to life -  giving a new focus for the local community.  It mixed traditional building methods with high-quality new build, to create vibrant, in-demand facilities for the area, including a public hall/events space, meeting rooms, a cafe, a nursery, community and commercial recording studios, heritage displays, plus over 10,000 sq ft of high spec office space. Complementing the buildings are a series of historically and socially unique stained glass windows from 1878, depicting the trades and working people of the local area, now restored and back on display for the first time in nearly half a century, alongside new artworks inspired by local people.
Find out more about the project at www.maryhillburghhalls.org.uk

 

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Muppets in Maryhill!

It's time to play the music, it's time to re-light the lights - as film returns to Maryhill Burgh Halls for the first time in decades! 

THE GROSVENOR CINEMA, IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE WEST END FESTIVAL, PRESENTS AN AUTHENTIC 35MM CINEMA EXPERIENCE AT MARYHILL BURGH HALLS ON 23RD JUNE AT 11AM.

The popular Grosvenor Cinema of Ashton Lane in Glasgow’s West End, as a part of The West End Festival,  are proud to present a community screening of the brilliant family movie ‘The Muppets’ at Maryhill Burgh Halls on Saturday 23rd June at 11am.

Tickets are only £1.00 but be there as you will see a demonstration of authentic 35m projected film. Have you ever wondered just what goes on behind that light at the back of the cinema in the projection box? On the 23rd June we will show you, using a genuine projector taken out of a Glasgow cinema that will not only be on display but will be used to show you ‘The Muppets’. Prior to the film we will also give a short talk of how 35m developed and how we have now entered the digital age.

Not only will this be lots of fun it will also be a great brief history lesson for all the family, not to mention a chance to experience a rapidly disappearing way of showing films on screen.

Ken Creelman, Cinema Development Manager for the Grosvenor Cinema said; “We are delighted to work with both The West End Festival and Maryhill Burgh Halls in bringing authentic 35m film to a unique setting for families in the area. As Glasgow’s oldest operating cinema, The Grosvenor wants to give something back to the community and showing films is still the most enjoyable family outing. We hope to do more of these screenings around Glasgow in the future but where better to start than this magnificent historic building, and as part of the West End Festival”.

Melanie Farrow; Manager of Maryhill Burgh Halls said; “Being able to bring the Muppets to the newly re-opened Maryhill Burgh Halls is fantastic – the Halls was showing films on Saturdays for children as long ago as 1910, so it’s a very appropriate location to learn about the heritage of film! We hold many different types of events here and I am sure cinema will be a welcome addition. We hope people both in Maryhill and across north Glasgow will enjoy this screening, which will hopefully lead to many more such shows”.

Ann McKechin, MP for Glasgow North said; “I am delighted that Maryhill Burgh Halls is partnering with the Grosvenor Cinema in this way. Both venues are huge assets to the local community and it makes perfect sense for local families to have use of the Grosvenor facilities right on their doorstep in the Burgh Halls. I look forward to many more screenings!”

Tickets for the screening of ‘The Muppets’ at Maryhill Burgh Halls can be purchased from The Grosvenor Cinema; www.grosvenorcafe.co.uk  0845 166 6028, or on the door at Maryhill Burgh Halls from 10am on the 23rd of June.

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Re-Opening Week Events in Late April

To celebrate the re-opening and completed restoration of the 134-year old Maryhill Burgh Halls, we are delighted to announce a series of free public events in late April - please come along to see the building, and what’s on offer!

Lunchtime Concert Performance

Monday 23rd April 2012 - 1pm - Free -
Featuring:
Barbara Downie, Violin, BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra,
Havilland Willshire, Piano, Dean of the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland, and
Jamie MacDougall, Voice, Presenter BBC Scotland
The programme is:
Sonata No. 3 in E Major by David Foulis 
Allegro-Largo-Allegro non troppo
Songs of Travel by Ralph Vaughan Williams
5 Melodies Op. 35 by Serge Prokofieff
Andante
Lento, ma non troppo
Animato, ma non allegro
Allegretto leggero e scherzando
Andante non troppo
Selection of Scottish songs arranged by Franz Joseph Haydn

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Open Rehearsal with Glasgow Orchestral Society

Monday 23rd April 2012 - between 7pm and 9pm - FREE

________________________________________

Tea Dance with Willie & Anne

Tuesday 24th April 2012 - 1pm - 3pm - Free

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Building Re-Opening Day - FREE

Saturday 28th April - 10am to 4pm
Building tours, music 
performances, exhibitions, talks, activities, ceramics workshops, demonstrations, plus vintage and modern fire engines on display.
Including:
Songs of the Trades Choir Performance - FREE - 2pm
Featuring award-winning singer Maeve McKinnon - a concert comprising 2 local schools and a community singing group, with a selection of songs entirely a-Capella in English, Scots and Gaelic.

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Maryhill’s New Stained Glass Windows of Today revealed at last !

Press Release:

Set of ten includes the world’s first ever interactive stained glass window!


Stained glass is an ancient art form that stretches back hundreds of years. Now, here at Maryhill Burgh Halls, we’re ready to reveal the world’s first ever interactive stained glass window. 

Scan the 2D barcode in the window with your smartphone, and you’ll be automatically taken to a webpage explaining the designs and giving information about the glass.

While the new glass is as modern as can be, stained glass in Maryhill has a long history: in 1878, the then Burgh commissioned twenty stained glass windows to showcase the trades and industries of Maryhill. They were designed by the artist Stephen Adam, and have become known as the crown jewels of Maryhill.

In 2010, Maryhill Burgh Halls Trust decided to commission ten new stained glass windows, to celebrate the completion of the multi-million pound restoration of the Halls.

Around 250 local people - ranging in age from 6 to well over 65! - got involved in the process, learning about the techniques involved in stained glass making, creating their own stained glass, and crucially, having their say as to the kinds of things the new windows should depict.

 

Featured in the original 1878 windows were boatbuilders, glassblowers, iron moulders and a canal boatman - what things would the people of modern Maryhill like to see captured in glass for the 21st century?

 

Glass artist Alec Galloway, working with community specialist Margo Winning, has distilled the hundreds of comments and suggestions down into a variety of themes depicted in ten new windows.

Alec says: “I have to thank everyone at Maryhill for giving me their time and having faith that I could deliver the ideas that were presented - the key to the project has been the close community involvement and the fact that so much has come directly from the people and imagery of Maryhill itself.

I wanted to create something different from the original 1878 Adam windows, but that would sit along side them and not become overshadowed. They are defined by the screenprinting technique, something that I'd only really done on a few pieces before - this then marks them out as being pretty unique as an architectural glass scheme anywhere in the UK.

I really do look forward to seeing them permanently on display in the Burgh Halls!

 

Margo commented: “It quickly emerged that the multiple layers of communities that make up Maryhill were very keen to express their thoughts and ideas in a range of ways; including writing, drawings, glass making and in endless interesting discussion and chat. It provided an enormously valuable introduction and connection to the area and community, letting me learn more about the place and people in a few weeks than I otherwise could have in years. It has been a delightful project to be involved in.

 

Gordon Barr, Heritage Development Officer for the Trust, said:
We’re really excited to finally see the results of all the hours of workshops and talks, and the effort put into this, not just from Alec and Margo, but from the literally hundreds of local people who got involved in various ways to have their say, try out some of the techniques involved in making stained glass, and in some cases, have their images actually featured in the glass itself.

The original Adam windows - which thanks to Glasgow Museums will be coming back to be displayed in the building very soon - have lasted over 130 years. Hopefully in another 130 years - around the year 2145 - the descendants of some of the school pupils featured in these new windows will be coming to the Burgh Halls to see just what their great-great grandfather looked like when he was in Primary 7 !


Key funding for the Windows of Today project came from the Heritage Lottery Fund. Colin McLean, Head of the Heritage Lottery Fund in Scotland, said: 

 “In 1878 the most magnificent stained glass windows were unveiled to celebrate the opening of the Burgh Halls. Over a hundred years on, the art of stained glass has inspired the community to come together again to celebrate their rich heritage. With their roots in the past, these new windows are a symbol of the future and the people of Maryhill should be extremely proud of what they have achieved.” 

 

The ten new windows have the following themes:

Education  - featuring Primary 7 children from a local school

Culture  - featuring Maryhill-born Turner prize winners Douglas Gordon & Susan Philipsz

Social Heritage  - featuring Jaconelli’s cafe 

Heavy Trades  - featuring the Maryhill canal and locks

Workers  - featuring the Bryant & May match factory

Space Age  - featuring a local company that makes satellites 

Youth  - featuring a local youth club

Sport and Leisure - featuring the Maryhill Harriers running club, and 2 local football teams

Regeneration  - featuring the Burgh Halls itself, and the silver key that opened it in 1878

Diversity - featuring some of the many different cultures now making up Maryhill

 

Connecting all the windows are excerpts from archive maps of the area, and lines from the song ‘Voices’, written by Kevin McDermott, about growing up in the Maryhill area.

 

Notes to Journalists

Using money raised through the National Lottery, the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) sustains and transforms a wide range of heritage for present and future generations to take part in, learn from and enjoy. From museums, parks and historic places to archaeology, natural environment and cultural traditions, we invest in every part of our diverse heritage.   To date it has invested over £500million in Scotland’s heritage.

Further information

Please contact Shiona Mackay on 01786 870638/07779 142890 (shionamackay1@btinternet.com) or Jon Williams on 0207 591 6035 (jonw@hlf.org.uk).  Website www.hlf.org.uk

 

This news release is issued by Maryhill Burgh Halls Trust www.maryhillburghhalls.org.uk 

Further information is available from Gordon Barr, Heritage Development Officer, 0794 081 5202 at any time or email: press@mbht.org.uk

 

About the Regeneration Project

The 133 year old building has undergone a £9.6 million restoration project, which has breathed new life into the iconic Halls, saved them for the community, created a thriving centre for business, and made the place once again the focus and beating heart of Maryhill.  

Maryhill Burgh Halls Trust raised this remarkable sum to secure a bright future for the treasured Halls and in so doing recapture the splendor of one of the city's best loved buildings. 

The restoration work began in November 2009 and is now complete, with the building due to open fully in the very near future.

In November 2010, the project was awarded a prize for best contribution to Urban Regeneration in Scotland through the use of European Structural Funds at the European Structural Funds Best Practice Awards. 

Maryhill Burgh Halls were the seat of municipal government in the days before Maryhill was a part of Glasgow. Built in 1878 and designed by renowned architect Duncan McNaughtan, they have lain derelict for the past eight years and are listed on the Buildings at Risk register. Once open, the Halls will include a modern public hall, cafe, 11 offices, a commercial and a community recording studio, a nursery, meeting rooms and courtyard garden. Around 7 years of hard work has been put into developing proposals for the project. 

The Board of the Trust, which comprises local people and representatives from partners Maryhill Housing Association, Cube Housing Association and Glasgow City Council, has worked tirelessly to deliver the restoration.

The contractor for the project Graham Construction has secured employment opportunities within the local community by creating three apprenticeships in joinery to work on the Halls restoration. Funding for the Maryhill Burgh Halls project has come from: 

 

European Regional Development Funding     £1.327m

Scottish Government City Growth Fund Phases 1 and 2     £1.26m 

Heritage Lottery Fund     £1.16m

Big Lottery - Growing Community Assets Fund      £980,910

Glasgow City Council Better Glasgow Fund      £1.02m

Glasgow City Council Vacant and Derelict Land Fund      £675,000

Scottish Government Town Centre Regeneration Fund      £1.8m

Historic Scotland      £593,000

Scottish Government Wider Role Fund £764,000

The Robertson Trust       £28,000

 

Everyone who is interested in following the development of the project through to completion can view progress and comment on the project on the Trust's Website at www.maryhillburghhalls.org.uk


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Unlocking the past with Maryhill's silver key!

 

When Maryhill Burgh Halls first opened in 1878, two silver keys were specially made to mark the occasion.
Astonishingly, over 133 years later, one of the original keys has turned up out of the blue!
In April 1878, the Glasgow Herald said that:
"the company assembled in front of the entrance to the Public Hall, where Bailie Murray presented Provost Robertson with a silver key, with which the Provost opened the hall door and invited the company to enter. [...]
The silver keys presented to Provost Robertson and ex-Provost Shaw were formed so as to be suitable for fish-slicers, and were supplied by Mr Sorley, jeweller, Argyll Street." 
 

Irene Scott, Chair of Maryhill Burgh Halls Trust said: "We were stunned when the Robertsons got in touch out of the blue, to say that not only were they descended from Provost James Robertson, but that they still had the silver key in their possession. We're delighted to be able to welcome Andrew Robertson, the great-great-grandson of Provost Robertson to Maryhill, and give him a sneak peak of the refurbished and restored Halls."
Andrew Robertson, who inherited the key, said: "We'd been researching our family history, and the connection to Maryhill and the Burgh Halls is one we're very proud of. There are branches of the family in Canada and the US, as well as South Africa and England, and we're hoping to have a reunion back in Maryhill in the Spring.
The reopening of the Halls is a really exciting venture and one in which I - and probably several other relations - would welcome to take part.  Five generations on, we have the opportunity to bring the key back to where it started - as a part of the heritage of Maryhill."
Gordon Barr, Heritage Development Officer for the Trust said: "It's fantastic that this silver key has turned up! We'd always hoped that it still existed somewhere - plus, I'd always wondered how a key could also be in the shape of a fish-slice, and now we know! It is a stunningly beautiful object, and an important part of the history of Maryhill.
We know there was also a second key, gifted to the former Provost of the Burgh James Shaw - so if any of his descendents are reading this, please get in touch!
We're also keen to hear from anyone else that has any memories, or particularly old photos or mementoes of the Burgh Halls  - did you get married there, or go to a dance? We'd love to be able to display more of the rich history of the area in the Halls when we re-open.
Please get in touch with us via email on info@mbht.org.uk or ring 0845 860 1878.
The Grand Re-opening of the Halls will be held in April next year - to tie in with the anniversary of the original opening in 1878 - when the silver key, and hopefully the Robertson family, will be in attendance to help officially declare the restored Halls fully open!

 

The 133 year old buildings, which contained 20 stained glass windows designed by Stephen Adam in 1878 depicting the trades of Maryhill, have undergone an over £9 million restoration project, which will breathe new life into the iconic Halls, save them for the community and create a thriving centre for local people and business use.  The restoration work began in November 2009. Maryhill Burgh Halls Trust raised this remarkable sum to secure a bright future for the treasured Halls and in so doing recapture the splendour of one of the city's best loved buildings. In November 2010, the project was awarded a prize for best contribution to Urban Regeneration in Scotland through the use of European Structural Funds.

Once restored, the Halls will include a modern public hall, cafe, 11 offices, a commercial and a community recording studio, a nursery, meeting rooms and garden courtyard.  The contractor for the project, Graham Construction, has secured employment opportunities within the local community by creating three apprenticeships in joinery to work on the Halls restoration.

The Funders for the project are: European Regional Development Funding , Scottish Government City Growth Fund Phases 1 and 2, Heritage Lottery Fund, Big Lottery - Growing Community Assets Fund, Glasgow City Council Better Glasgow Fund, Glasgow City Council Vacant and Derelict Land Fund, Scottish Government Town Centre Regeneration Fund,  Historic Scotland, Scottish Government Wider Role Fund, The Robertson Trust.

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Grassroots Organic to provide catering for Maryhill Burgh Halls

The refurbished Maryhill Burgh Halls are set to re-open towards the end of October 2011 – and when they do, the café and catering facilities will be provided by long established Glasgow company Grassroots Organic. 

Irene Scott, Chair of Maryhill Burgh Halls Trust said “The Trust is delighted to announce that the well known Glasgow business, Grassroots Organic, will be both the operator for the Cafe within the buildings and the catering provider for functions in the Halls.”

Louise Duncan, Director of Grassroots Organic said "We are really looking forward to opening up in Maryhill in the fabulous spaces in the newly restored Halls.  When we started our store and restaurant at St George’s Cross in Glasgow over 10 years ago, it was with the aim of promoting better nutrition and good health.  That aim holds true today and will be the focus of our operation at Maryhill Burgh Halls.  At Grassroots, we pride ourselves on the quality and tastiness of our food – both meat and vegetarian.  Our catering for weddings and events will be tailored to customer requirements and budgets.   We will also circulate a monthly newsletter with a focus on seasonal foods and we will hold classes and talks suitable for a variety of age groups focussing on health weeks and health issues."

Image - From left to right: Melanie Farrow, Halls Manager; Louise Duncan, Director, Grassroots Organic

The Halls will be an exciting new destination for both the local and wider community and will once again be the beating heart of Maryhill.  If you would like to get involved as a volunteer, or to find out about our facilities for meetings, events, weddings and dinners, please get in touch – email us at info@mbht.org.uk or ring Halls Manager Melanie Farrow on 0845 860 1891 for more details or to make a booking.

Melanie Farrow, Halls Manager said: “The Trust is delighted that the buildings will soon be open for business and would like to invite everyone who is interested to come and see the buildings and make use of the facilities.”

The 133 year old buildings, which contained 20 stained glass windows designed by Stephen Adam in 1878 depicting the trades of Maryhill, have undergone an over £9 million restoration project, which will breathe new life into the iconic Halls, save them for the community and create a thriving centre for local people and business use.  The restoration work began in November 2009. Maryhill Burgh Halls Trust raised this remarkable sum to secure a bright future for the treasured Halls and in so doing recapture the splendour of one of the city's best loved buildings. In November 2010, the project was awarded a prize for best contribution to Urban Regeneration in Scotland through the use of European Structural Funds.

Once restored, the Halls will include a modern public hall, cafe, 11 offices, a commercial and a community recording studio, a nursery, meeting rooms and garden courtyard.  The contractor for the project, Graham Construction, has secured employment opportunities within the local community by creating three apprenticeships in joinery to work on the Halls restoration.

The Funders for the project are: European Regional Development Funding , Scottish Government City Growth Fund Phases 1 and 2, Heritage Lottery Fund, Big Lottery - Growing Community Assets Fund, Glasgow City Council Better Glasgow Fund, Glasgow City Council Vacant and Derelict Land Fund, Scottish Government Town Centre Regeneration Fund,  Historic Scotland, Scottish Government Wider Role Fund, The Robertson Trust.

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Burgh Halls regains its Manager!

The post of Halls Manager at Maryhill Burgh Halls has been vacant for many years. Now, with the Halls set to re-open later this year after an award winning multi-million pound regeneration project, Melanie Farrow has taken up the post to run Halls fit for the 21st century.

Melanie’s new role will draw on her extensive experience in both personal and professional arenas; she has been running venues and events of all sizes for nearly twenty years, and has a keen interest in dance and fitness practice – all of which will stand her in good stead in making a renewed success of the Burgh Halls.
 

From left to right: 
Melanie Farrow, Halls Manager; Irene Scott, MBHT Chair; Hunter Reid, Project Coordinator

Melanie said:
“Having previously worked on a number of new build arts related projects, I am relishing the prospect of working with Maryhill Burgh Halls Trust and the reinvigorated Halls. I am looking forward to working with the local and wider community to make the Halls an exciting destination, and help make them once again the focal point of the community.
If you would like to get involved, or to find out about our facilities for meetings, events, weddings and dinners, please do not hesitate in getting in touch – email us at info@mbht.org.uk or ring 0141 948 1131 for more details!”

Heritage Development Officer Gordon Barr added:
 “From some of the old Burgh Minutes, it seems that the first holder of the post in 1878 was one David MacFarlane, and that the post of Hall Keeper used to have a uniform consisting of a specially made coat, waistcoat, trousers and cap. We may have to look into reinstating this tradition for our new Halls Manager when we re-open later in the year!”

Irene Scott, Chair of Maryhill Burgh Halls Trust said: “The trust are delighted to have Melanie join the team in this new, and crucial role. We’re sure that she will help make the Halls a great success.”

Notes to Journalists
This news release is issued by Maryhill Burgh Halls Trust www.maryhillburghhalls.org.uk
Further information is available from Hunter Reid, Project Co-ordinator and Company Secretary on 07808 739627 or Dr Gordon Barr, Heritage Development Officer, 0794 081 5202 at any time
email: press@mbht.org.uk

About the Project
The 133 year old building is undergoing a £9.2 million restoration project, which will breathe new life into the iconic Halls, save them for the community, create a thriving centre for business, and make the place once again the focus and beating heart of Maryhill.  
Maryhill Burgh Halls Trust raised this remarkable sum to secure a bright future for the treasured Halls and in so doing recapture the splendor of one of the city's best loved buildings. The restoration work began in November 2009 and is scheduled for completion later this year.
In November 2010, the project was awarded a prize as Best contribution to Urban Regeneration in Scotland through the use of European Structural Funds at the European Structural Funds Best Practice Awards.
Maryhill Burgh Halls were the seat of municipal government in the days before Maryhill was a part of Glasgow. Built in 1878 and designed by renowned architect Duncan McNaughtan, they have lain derelict for the past eight years and are listed on the Buildings at Risk register.
Once restored, the Halls will include a modern public hall, cafe, 11 offices, a commercial and a community recording studio, a nursery, meeting rooms and courtyard garden.
Around 6 years of hard work has been put into developing proposals for the project. The Board of the Trust, which comprises local people and representatives from partners Maryhill Housing Association, Cube Housing Association and Glasgow City Council, has worked tirelessly to deliver the restoration.
The contractor for the project Graham Construction has secured employment opportunities within the local community by creating three apprenticeships in joinery to work on the Halls restoration.
 
Funding for the Maryhill Burgh Halls project has come from:
European Regional Development Funding                         £1.279m
Scottish Government City Growth Fund Phases 1 and 2    £1.25m
Heritage Lottery Fund                                                      £990,000
Big Lottery - Growing Community Assets Fund                  £980,910
Glasgow City Council Better Glasgow Fund                        £1.02m
Glasgow City Council Vacant and Derelict Land Fund         £650,000
Scottish Government Town Centre Regeneration Fund     £1.8m
Historic Scotland                                                             £500,000
Scottish Government Wider Role Fund                             £750,000
The Robertson Trust                                                        £28,000
 
Everyone who is interested in following the development of the project through to completion can view progress and comment on the project on the Trust's Website at www.maryhillburghhalls.org.uk
 

 

 

 

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Maryhill Stained Glass: 130 year old mystery solved at last!

The mystery of the unknown worker has been solved. 
 
A stunning series of 20 stained glass panels were commissioned for the Maryhill Burgh Halls in 1878, featuring the many varied trades and industries of the area.
Most are easily identifiable images such as a gas worker, iron moulder, joiner or boat-builder. 
But one of the panels has remained a mystery – and with all the original paperwork having been long since lost, there was no easy way to figure out exactly what sort of job the ‘Unknown Worker’ was doing.
 
Years of research had been unable to positively identify it – and suggestions varied from a metal casting process, a brewing process or even a steam laundry.
 
 
This long-standing mystery has finally been solved by Glaswegian Michael Meighan, who has been researching for his new book ‘Glaswegians with a Flourish’. Said Michael:
 
“I was aware of the Maryhill stained glass puzzle, and I was as intrigued as anyone. While I was investigating the role of the Mechanics Institute in Glasgow – which was attended by Scotland’s first oil tycoon James ‘Paraffin’ Young -  I came across the Institute’s ‘Mechanics Magazine’ published in 1824 and held by the National Library of Scotland. 
 
On the front page of one of the issues was a drawing of a press almost exactly like the equipment being used in the stained glass window.
Imagine my growing interest as I started reading a ‘Description of the Great Bandana Gallery in the Turkey Red factory of Messrs Monteith & Co. at Glasgow’. 
 
This described in detail the process of using a hydrostatic press to impregnate and pattern cotton cloth with Turkey red dye. In this case this factory contained presses which produced bandanas for foreign markets including the iconic scarves worn by the American cowboys!
Turkey red dyeing was originally brought to Scotland from France, and became a massively important industry in the West of Scotland in the 1800’s. 
Besides cowboy bandanas, the British Redcoats were dyed with Turkey red, as well as beautifully patterned cloths which were exported throughout the world. 
 
The dyeing process was revolutionary as it allowed whole cloths to be dyed, rather than the threads from which they were made, shortening the process considerably.  One factory that had 16 presses of the type shown was able to produce 1600 pieces of 12 yards each in just ten hours.”
 
Heritage Development Officer for the Trust, Gordon Barr, said:
“Just when I started to think we’d never know for sure what was going on in this panel, I got a phone call from Michael out of the blue! We’re delighted to have the mystery solved, and fill in the last blank.
 
But just as one puzzle is solved, it also reveals more questions to be asked – we don’t know which company in the Maryhill area might have been using this process at the time the panels were commissioned – so there’s still more to find out to keep us busy!”
 
Thanks to a partnership with Glasgow Museums, who have had the glass in safe keeping for nearly 50 years, the restoration will also see a significant collection of the original stained glass windows, conserved and returned to the Burgh Halls for display once the building is re-opened later this year. 
 
In addition, the Trust has recently commissioned 10 new stained glass “Windows of Today” which will depict life in Maryhill as it is now. 
 
 
Notes to Journalists:  
 
This news release is issued by Maryhill Burgh Halls Trust www.maryhillburghhalls.org.uk 
 
Further information is available from Hunter Reid, Project Co-ordinator and Company Secretary on 07808 739627 or Dr Gordon Barr, Heritage Development Officer, 0794 081 5202 at any time email: press@mbht.org.uk
 
Michael Meighan is the author of ‘Glasgow Smells’ and ‘Glasgow Smells Better’. ‘Glaswegians with a Flourish’ is due to be published in May and he is currently working on a book on Scottish Industry in which Turkey Red will feature.
Contact via email: Michael_meighan1@hotmail.com
Phone 0131 447 9461 or 0776 8282 155
 
 
About the Project
 
The 133 year old building is undergoing a £9.2 million restoration project, which will breathe new life into the iconic Halls, save them for the community, create a thriving centre for business, and make the place once again the focus and beating heart of Maryhill.    Maryhill Burgh Halls Trust raised this remarkable sum to secure a bright future for the treasured Halls and in so doing recapture the splendor of one of the city's best loved buildings. The restoration work began in November 2009 and is scheduled for completion later this year.
 
In November 2010, the project was awarded a prize as Best contribution to Urban Regeneration in Scotland through the use of European Structural Funds at the European Structural Funds Best Practice Awards.  
 
Maryhill Burgh Halls were the seat of municipal government in the days before Maryhill was a part of Glasgow. Built in 1878 and designed by renowned architect Duncan McNaughtan, they have lain derelict for the past eight years and are listed on the Buildings at Risk register.  Once restored, the Halls will include a modern public hall, cafe, 11 offices, a commercial and a community recording studio, a nursery, meeting rooms and courtyard garden.   Around 6 years of hard work has been put into developing proposals for the project. The Board of the Trust, which comprises local people and representatives from partners Maryhill Housing Association, Cube Housing Association and Glasgow City Council, has worked tirelessly to deliver the restoration.
 
The contractor for the project Graham Construction has secured employment opportunities within the local community by creating three apprenticeships in joinery to work on the Halls restoration.  
 
Funding for the Maryhill Burgh Halls project has come from: 
European Regional Development Funding    £1.279m 
Scottish Government City Growth Fund Phases 1 and 2    £1.25m  
Heritage Lottery Fund    £990,000 
Big Lottery - Growing Community Assets Fund     £980,910 
Glasgow City Council Better Glasgow Fund     £1.02m 
Glasgow City Council Vacant and Derelict Land Fund     £650,000 
Scottish Government Town Centre Regeneration Fund     £1.8m 
Historic Scotland     £500,000 
Scottish Government Wider Role Fund £750,000 
The Robertson Trust      £28,000 
 
Everyone who is interested in following the development of the project through to completion can view progress and comment on the project on the Trust's Website at www.maryhillburghhalls.org.uk

 

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Towering Achievement: Maryhill Burgh Halls regains its crowning glory

For over a hundred years, the facade of Maryhill Burgh Halls was topped by an elegant, octagonal cupola tower, crowned by a wind vane - but it was removed in the early 1980s as it was becoming dangerous.

Now, as a major milestone in the ongoing, award-winning £9.2 million restoration project, a brand new hand-crafted replica of the original tower has been lifted up to the roof - over 60 feet above the street - by a giant crane.


The building contractor putting the building together is Graham Construction. The new cupola has been designed by JM Architects to be as close as possible a replica of the original, based on archive photos and drawings. Built by hand by specialist joinery contractors Hutton and Read, the cupola tower is an impressive 5 feet in diameter, 12 feet high, and is made from Douglas Fir, covered in hand-worked lead.

The wind vane is also hand made, designed and manufactured specially by P Johnston & Co. blacksmiths at Ratho Byres Forge

Irene Scott, Chair of the Trust said:

“Now fixed back on the crest of the roof, the stunning cupola restores the exterior of this historic listed building back to how it looked when it first opened in 1878. It helps show the grand scale and ambition of the original, as well as helping to make clear how much progress has been made in the lead up to the Halls finally re-opening later this year.”

Hunter Reid, Project Co-ordinator and Company Secretary of the Trust added:

“The tower isn’t just decorative - it also forms a key part of the ventilation system of the refurbished building, which as much as possible uses natural ventilation to draw fresh air into the building. It’s great to see it back, and we’re delighted by the attention to detail and high-quality workmanship involved”.

Notes to Journalists:

 

This news release is issued by Maryhill Burgh Halls Trust www.maryhillburghhalls.org.uk

Further information is available from Hunter Reid, Project Co-ordinator and Company Secretary on 07808 739627 or Dr Gordon Barr, Heritage Development Officer, 0794 081 5202 at any time

e mail: press@mbht.org.uk

 

About the Project

 

The 132 year old building is just over half way through a £9.2 million restoration project, which will breathe new life into the iconic Halls, save them for the community, create a thriving centre for business, and make the place once again the focus and beating heart of Maryhill.  

 

Maryhill Burgh Halls Trust raised this remarkable sum to secure a bright future for the treasured Halls and in so doing recapture the splendor of one of the city's best loved buildings. The restoration work began in November 2009 and is scheduled for completion in the summer of 2011.

 

In November 2011, the project was awarded a prize as Best contribution to Urban Regeneration in Scotland through the use of European Structural Funds at the European Structural Funds Best Practice Awards.

 

Maryhill Burgh Halls were the seat of municipal government in the days before Maryhill was a part of Glasgow. Built in 1878 and designed by renowned architect Duncan McNaughtan, they have lain derelict for the past eight years and are listed on the Buildings at Risk register.

 

Once restored, the Halls will include a modern public hall, cafe, 11 offices, a commercial and a community recording studio, a nursery, meeting rooms and courtyard garden.

 

Around 6 years of hard work has been put into developing proposals for the project. The Board of the Trust, which comprises local people and representatives from partners Maryhill Housing Association, Cube Housing Association and Glasgow City Council, has worked tirelessly to deliver the restoration.

The outstanding architectural appeal and historic merit of the Halls is further enhanced by a unique series of stained glass panels depicting the trades and industries of Maryhill in the late 19th century, and which are currently in safe keeping with Glasgow Museums.

 

The restoration will also see a significant collection of the 20 stained glass windows, conserved and returned to the Burgh Halls. In addition, the Trust has recently commissioned 10 new “Windows of Today” which will depict life in Maryhill as it is now.

 

The contractor for the project Graham Construction has secured employment opportunities within the local community by creating three apprenticeships in joinery to work on the Halls restoration.

 

Funding of the project has come from the following sources:

European Regional Development Funding    £1.279m

Scottish Government City Growth Fund Phases 1 and 2    £1.25m

Heritage Lottery Fund    £990,000

Big Lottery - Growing Community Assets Fund     £980,910

Glasgow City Council Better Glasgow Fund     £1.02m

Glasgow City Council Vacant and Derelict Land Fund     £650,000

Scottish Government Town Centre Regeneration Fund     £1.8m

Historic Scotland     £500,000

Scottish Government Wider Role Fund £750,000

The Robertson Trust      £28,000

 

Everyone who is interested in following the development of the project through to completion can view progress and comment on the project on the Trust's Website at www.maryhillburghhalls.org.uk

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EUROPEAN AWARD FOR MARYHILL BURGH HALLS !

Maryhill's historic Burgh Halls received a prestigious award today.  The award was for Best Contribution to Urban Regeneration in Scotland through the use of European Structural Funds in the 2007 to 2013 Programme.

 
The award was presented by Keith Brown MSP, Scottish Government Minister for Skills and Lifelong Learning at a ceremony at Glasgow School of Art.
This award recognizes the Trust’s work in involving the community throughout the project and undertaking significant ongoing outreach work with local organisations and the best practice of bringing together sensitive historic building restoration with dynamic contemporary design plus new outdoor spaces.
MSP Keith Brown, left, presents the award to Trust Chair Irene Scott, with Hunter Reid and Donna Brooks. 
Chair of the Trust Irene Scott said: “The refurbishment of the Maryhill Burgh Halls will restore an invaluable cultural asset in Glasgow, upgrading it as a place for the local community to meet and socialise. It will also be a dynamic and important place for businesses and enterprises to flourish.”
 
Hunter Reid, Project Co-ordinator and Company Secretary of the Trust said: 
“All of the Board Members of the Trust are delighted that the Trust has received this national award.  We would all like to say a huge thank you to the European Structural Funds Programme both for the award, and for the funding given to the Trust.  Thanks also to all of our funders, the project team and everyone else who has given their support to the project. We are all very much looking forward to the Halls opening next summer.” 
The 132 year old building is just over half way through a £9.2 million restoration project, which will breathe new life into the iconic Halls, save them for the community, create a thriving centre for business, and make the place once again the focus and beating heart of Maryhill.  
 
Maryhill Burgh Halls Trust raised this remarkable sum to secure a bright future for the treasured Halls and in so doing recapture the splendor of one of the city's best loved buildings. The restoration work began in November 2009 and is scheduled for completion in the summer of 2011.
 
Maryhill Burgh Halls were the seat of municipal government in the days before Maryhill was a part of Glasgow. Built in 1878 and designed by renowned architect Duncan McNaughtan, they have lain derelict for the past eight years and are listed on the Buildings at Risk register.
 
Once restored, the Halls will include a modern public hall, cafe, 11 offices, a commercial and a community recording studio, a nursery, meeting rooms and courtyard garden. 
 
Around 6 years of hard work has been put into developing proposals for the project. The Board of the Trust, which comprises local people and representatives from partners Maryhill Housing Association, Cube Housing Association and Glasgow City Council, has worked tirelessly to deliver the restoration.
The outstanding architectural appeal and historic merit of the Halls is further enhanced by a unique series of stained glass panels depicting the trades and industries of Maryhill in the late 19th century, and which are currently in safe keeping with Glasgow Museums.
 
The restoration will also see a significant collection of the 20 stained glass windows, conserved and returned to the Burgh Halls. In addition, the Trust has recently commissioned 10 new “Windows of Today” which will depict life in Maryhill as it is now.
 
The contractor for the project Graham Construction has secured employment opportunities within the local community by creating three apprenticeships in joinery to work on the Halls restoration.
 
Funding of the project has come from the following sources: 
European Regional Development Funding    £1.279m
Scottish Government City Growth Fund Phases 1 and 2    £1.25m 
Heritage Lottery Fund    £990,000
Big Lottery - Growing Community Assets Fund     £980,910
Glasgow City Council Better Glasgow Fund     £1.02m
Glasgow City Council Vacant and Derelict Land Fund     £650,000
Scottish Government Town Centre Regeneration Fund     £1.8m
Historic Scotland     £500,000
Scottish Government Housing and Regeneration Directorate    £750,000
The Robertson Trust      £28,000
 
Everyone who is interested in following the development of the project through to completion can view progress and comment on the project on the Trust's Website at www.maryhillburghhalls.org.uk
Further information on the European Structural Funds Mid-Programme Best Practice Awards can be found at http://www.esep.co.uk/07-news-updates.html
ends
Notes to Journalists: 
This news release is issued by Maryhill Burgh Halls Trust www.maryhillburghhalls.org.uk 
Further information is available from Hunter Reid, Project Co-ordinator and Company Secretary on 07808 739627 or Dr Gordon Barr, Heritage Development Officer, 0794 0815202 at any time
e mail: info@mbht.org.uk

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GETTING YOUR HANDS ON HISTORY!

Halls throw open the doors for exclusive hands-on heritage preview which proves a sell-out hit 

MARYHILL Burgh Halls has thrown open its doors for an exclusive “hands-on” preview as the £9.2 million restoration gathers pace.
Maryhill Burgh Halls Trust held three free “Heritage Trades Workshops” for people ranging from 10 years old to over 80, to give them a feel of the impressive drive to bring the Halls back to life.
The workshops are part of the Trust’s ongoing education campaign to inform people of the work being undertaken after the incredible fund-raising target was reached. Work began on site last year and will be completed in Summer 2011.
Built in 1878, the Halls will soon re-open as an impressive 21st century community asset, which will recapture the splendid historic beauty of this architectural gem, and incorporate a modern public hall, cafe, 11 offices, a commercial and a community recording studio, a nursery, and meeting rooms, all wrapped round a central outdoor garden courtyard. 
Primary school pupils from St Charles Primary, Maryhill, students from the Glasgow Metropolitan College (soon to become the City of Glasgow College) studying Construction Crafts as well as interested adults of all ages, many of who live locally, all took part in the Heritage Workshops, which were fully booked.
They received a tour of the building site, got to grips with wood, slate and stone, and enjoyed demonstrations from and asked questions of skilled craftsmen from Graham Construction, ScotCourt Stonemasons and South West Roofing. 
Dr Gordon Barr, Heritage Development Officer at Maryhill Burgh Halls Trust, said: “It was intended as a hands on experience allowing people to see what is really going on behind the scaffolding.
“Keeping people informed of our work is essential, because the Halls are being restored for the community. They are an iconic and treasured city building and the Heritage Workshops gave a fascinating insight into the building works, and the crucial role skilled craftsmen and women are playing to make that happen.
“Over a third of those attending live within 2 miles of the halls, and over two-thirds within 3 miles. That shows that local people are deeply engaged and interested in the restoration of their Halls.”
Those attending learned about:
*how traditional slates are carefully shaped by hand and fixed to a roof
*how traditional sash and casement windows work and how wooden sashes are jointed 
*how stone is finished and repaired
*where the historic stained glass which the Halls are famed for will be restored
*the difference between traditional lime and cement-based mortars and how construction techniques have changed over the centuries
Hunter Reid, Project Co-ordinator for the Trust, added: “The feedback we got from locals, teachers and pupils was amazingly positive - especially from those that got the chance to do some re-pointing work in the Hall itself, providing a personal and long-lasting contribution to the restoration works.”
Maryhill Burgh Halls Trust comprises of people living or working within the local community and 3 key partner organisations - Maryhill Housing Association, Cube Housing Association and Glasgow City Council. 
www.maryhillburghhalls.org.uk
ends
Notes to Journalists:
The full breakdown of the funding received by Maryhill Burgh Halls Trust for the restoration of the Halls is as follows:
Scottish Government City Growth Fund Phases 1 and 2    £1.25m 
Heritage Lottery Fund    £990,000
Big Lottery - Growing Community Assets Fund     £980,910
European Regional Development Funding    £1.279m 
Glasgow City Council Better Glasgow Fund     £1.02m
Glasgow City Council Vacant and Derelict Land Fund     £650,000
Scottish Government Town Centres Regeneration Fund     £1.8m
Historic Scotland     £500,000
Scottish Government Housing and Regeneration Directorate    £750,000
The Robertson Trust   £28,000
Total: £9.2 million 
News release issued by Ross Wilson Public Relations (www.rosswilsonpr.com) on behalf of the Maryhill Burgh Halls Trust. Further details from Ross on 07768 280021.

 

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Stained Glass Tender Opportunity: Help design the 'Windows of Today'

When the Maryhill Burgh Halls were opened in 1878, the local councillors commissioned a series of twenty stained glass panels, depicting the trades and industries of Maryhill at the time, from Glasgow-based designer Stephen Adam.

The Trust has funding in place, and has just issued a Commissioning Brief for, a major new stained glass-based arts and interpretation project called the ‘Windows of Today’.  

This will involve two main strands:
Firstly, a series workshops and hands-on opportunities for local people to learn about the history and practicalities of stained glass manufacture, while providing input into what they feel new stained glass should represent; 
Secondly, the design and construction of a series of brand new stained glass windows representing the Maryhill of today, based on the feedback and input from the local community workshops.

We would like to invite you to consider tendering for the contract to provide the services described above. Further details can be found here, or on the Public Contracts Scotland website at 
http://www.publiccontractsscotland.gov.uk
(with Tender ID no. JUL080233).

Along with some of the original Stephen Adam stained glass, which will be displayed in the Halls on loan from Glasgow Museums, the newly commissioned ‘Windows of Today’ will feature prominently in the ongoing marketing and promotion of the Burgh Halls; this will therefore be a high-profile, large scale commission.

If you are interested in getting involved, please get back to me as described in the attached document by 5pm on the 16th of August; or if you have any specific questions or queries please don’t hesitate to get in touch in the meantime.

 

info@mbht.org.uk Tel. 0141 948 1104

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History in the making! Apprentices find work bringing Maryhill’s beloved Burgh Halls back to life

 

EXCITING plans to bring one of Glasgow’s most iconic buildings back to life is helping to create jobs for young people.
Maryhill Burgh Halls is undergoing a £9.2 million restoration thanks to a massive community effort led by the Maryhill Burgh Halls Trust.
And as the work continues, new apprentices have been hired to join the highly skilled team working on the project.
Contractors Graham Construction have taken on two young apprentices and a third will join them later this year.
YOU’VE BEEN FRAMED.......APPRENTICES DAVID McCLURE AND DANIEL DONNACHIE WITH PART OF THE HERITAGE OF THE HALLS – A REPLICA STAINED GLASS WINDOW WHICH IS PART OF THE RESTORATION
Seventeen year olds David McClure from the city’s Robroyston area and Daniel Donnachie from Springburn are both hard at work on the project which is due for completion next year.
Once restored, the Halls will be a fabulous 21st century community asset and be developed into a modern public hall, cafe, 11 offices, a commercial and a community recording studio, a nursery, meeting rooms and courtyard garden. 
Both teenagers whose apprenticeship is in joinery have been employed by Graham thanks to the involvement of Glasgow North Regeneration Agency.
They will return to North Glasgow College in August to continue their studies while also continuing to work on site at the halls.
David said: “This is very interesting job to be working on as part of our apprenticeship. It won’t be long until the halls once again become something that local people can be proud of and we’re pleased to be playing our part.”
Daniel added: “ We’re delighted to be involved in the restoration of Maryhill Burgh Halls and also very grateful for the training we are receiving with Graham Construction and at North Glasgow College.”
John McHugh, Contracts Manager at Graham added: “We have a strong commitment at Graham to employing young apprentices and ensuring they acquire all the skills they need for a rewarding and enjoyable  career .”
This week the two apprentices met representatives from one of the project’s major funders - the Big Lottery Fund - when it came to inspect the work following its £980,000 generous contribution towards the total raised. 
Big Lottery Fund Scotland’s Chair Alison Magee and Committee Member Helen Forsyth toured the ongoing  work and were welcomed by Irene Scott, Chair of the Maryhill Burgh Halls Trust.  
The Trust comprises of people living or working within the local community and 3 key partner organisations - Maryhill Housing Association, Cube Housing Association and Glasgow City Council. 
The grant from Big Lottery Fund Scotland came from its “Growing Community Assets” fund in April last year.
Alison Magee said:  “When we made the decision to fund this community led project we knew that we were putting Lottery money in the hands of local people who had the drive, determination and passion to turn a dream into reality. Since then a year has passed and I am delighted to see what has been achieved so far and to meet those people who have given their all to get the project off the ground. I look forward to the day when I can return for the official opening of the Halls and join in the celebrations that the restoration of this much loved historical building will bring.”
ends
 
Notes to Journalists:
News release issued by Ross Wilson Public Relations (www.rosswilsonpr.com) on behalf of the Maryhill Burgh Halls Trust. Further details from Ross on 07768 280021.

 

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BIG PROGRESS AS THE HALLS TAKE SHAPE

Big Lottery Fund Scotland visits Maryhill Burgh Halls
MARYHILL'S historic Burgh Halls this week played host to a visit by the Big Lottery Fund Scotland which is a key funder of the restoration work.
Big Lottery Fund Scotland has provided grant funding to the tune of £980,910 - a major contribution to the overall £9.2 million cost. 
Big Lottery Fund Scotland’s Chair Alison Magee and Committee Member Helen Forsyth toured the ongoing work which is due for completion next year.
They were welcomed by Irene Scott, Chair of the Maryhill Burgh Halls Trust.  
The Trust comprises of  people living or working within the local community and 3 key partner organisations - Maryhill Housing Association, Cube Housing Association and Glasgow City Council. 
Once restored, the Halls will be a fabulous 21st century community asset which will recapture the splendid historic beauty of one of the city's most
treasured buildings and be developed  into a modern public hall, cafe, 11 offices, a commercial and a community recording studio, a nursery, meeting
rooms and courtyard garden. 
The grant from Big Lottery Fund Scotland came from its “Growing Community Assets” fund in April last year.
Hunter Reid,  Project Co ordinator and Company Secretary of the Trust said: “The Big Lottery Fund Scotland money is a vital part of the overall funding needed to restore the Halls. It will allow us to hand back Maryhill Burgh Halls to the people of this community and make it a historic yet modern-day asset to benefit the people who live here and who are firmly in the driving seat.”
Alison Magee said:  “When we made the decision to fund this community led project we knew that we were putting Lottery money in the hands of local people who had the drive, determination and passion to turn a dream into reality. Since then a year has passed and I am delighted to see what has been achieved so far and to meet those people who have given their all to get the project off the ground. I look forward to the day when I can return for the official opening of the Halls and join in the celebrations that the restoration of this much loved historical building will bring.”
The Big Lottery Fund (BIG) is the largest distributor of National Lottery good cause funding and is responsible for giving out half the money raised for good causes by the National Lottery.
BIG is committed to bringing real improvements to communities and the lives of people most in need and has been rolling out grants to health, education, environment and charitable causes across the UK since June 2004. The Fund was formally established by Parliament on 1 December 2006.
The Scotland Committee has been making Big Lottery Fund decisions on Scottish projects since March 2007. 
ends
Notes to Journalists:
The full breakdown of the funding received by Maryhill Burgh Halls Trust for the restoration of the halls is as follows:
Scottish Government City Growth Fund Phases 1 and 2    £1.25m 
Heritage Lottery Fund    £990,000
Big Lottery - Growing Community Assets Fund     £980,910
European Regional Development Funding    £1.279m 
Glasgow City Council Better Glasgow Fund     £1.02m
Glasgow City Council Vacant and Derelict Land Fund     £650,000
Scottish Government Town Centres Regeneration Fund     £1.8m
Historic Scotland     £500,000
Scottish Government Housing and Regeneration Directorate    £750,000
The Robertson Trust   £28,000
Total: £9.2 million 
News release issued by Ross Wilson Public Relations (www.rosswilsonpr.com) on behalf of the Maryhill Burgh Halls Trust. Further details from Ross on 07768 280021.

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Replica stained glass panel on display in Glasgow Club, Maryhill

On display in the foyer of the Glasgow Club Maryhill, Gairbraid Avenue.

The panel is the Engineers - The likely source of this panel is the Maryhill Engine Works on Lochburn Road, built in 1873 for the Clarkson Brothers. Possibly one of the brothers is featured here, explaining to the workman with the spanner the details of the next job. The building still exists in Lochburn Road.

The Andy Scott designed Firemen Gates can be seen in the background.

Thanks to Glasgow Museums for the loan of the replica panel.

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MINISTER VISITS THE HALLS SAVED FOR MARYHILL

Praise for “cultural gem’ as Alex Neil sees first hand how historic halls are being brought back to life

Monday, April 26 2010
     
THE campaign to save Maryhill's historic Burgh Halls took a major step forward today.
132 years to the day after the Halls were opened, Housing and Communities Minister Alex Neil visited the ongoing £9.2 million restoration project, which will breathe new life into the iconic Halls and save them for the community.  
Alex Neil and Maryhill Burgh Halls Trust Chair Irene Scott, with reproductions of two of the stained glass panels in the background

The Minister's visit follows a contribution from the Scottish Government's Town Centre Regeneration Fund of £1.8 million - the largest single piece of funding in the £9.2 million total.
Maryhill Burgh Halls Trust raised this remarkable sum to secure a bright future for the treasured halls and in doing so recapture the splendour of one of the city's best loved buildings. Work began in November 2009 and will be completed in May 2011.
 
Maryhill Burgh Halls were the seat of municipal government in the days when Maryhill was a Burgh. They were built in 1878 and designed by renowned architect Duncan McNaughtan, but have lain derelict for the past eight years and are listed on the buildings at risk register.
Once restored, the Halls will include a modern public hall, cafe, 11 offices, a commercial and a community recording studio, a nursery, meeting rooms and courtyard garden. 
While at Maryhill the Minister signed a steel beam which forms part of structural steelwork which is ongoing at present.
More than 5 years hard work has been put into developing proposals for the project. The Board of the Trust, which comprises local people and representatives from partners Maryhill Housing Association, Cube Housing Association and Glasgow City Council have worked tirelessly to deliver the restoration.
Funding of the project has come from the following sources: 
Scottish Government City Growth Fund Phases 1 and 2    £1.25m 
Heritage Lottery Fund    £990,000
Big Lottery - Growing Community Assets Fund     £980,910
European Regional Development Funding    £1.279m 
Glasgow City Council Better Glasgow Fund     £1.02m
Glasgow City Council Vacant and Derelict Land Fund     £650,000
Scottish Government Town Centre Regeneration Fund     £1.8m
Historic Scotland     £500,000
Scottish Government Housing and Regeneration Directorate    £750,000
The Robertson Trust      £28,000
The outstanding architectural appeal and historic merit of the Halls is further enhanced by a unique series of stained glass panels depicting the trades and industries of Maryhill in the late 19th century and which are currently in the city archives.
The restoration will also see a significant collection of these 20 windows, which were taken out for safe keeping in 1963, returned to the Burgh Halls.
Facsimile of the Steel Moulders panel, showing where in the Halls the stained glass was originally displayed
Housing and Communities Minister Alex Neil said: “The £60 million Town Centre Regeneration Fund has succeeded in encouraging dynamic public and private sector organisations to get involved in regeneration projects that will have a lasting and widespread effect. 
“The refurbishment of the Maryhill Burgh Halls will restore an invaluable cultural asset in Glasgow, upgrading it as a place for the local community to meet and socialise. 
“It has a rich artistic history and I hope that with this funding, it will once again take its place as one of Scotland's cultural gems.”
Hunter Reid, Project Co-ordinator and Company Secretary of the Trust, said: 
“All of the Board Members of the Trust are delighted with the progress of the works on site and would like to say a huge thank you to all of the funders, the project team and everyone else who has given their support to the project. We are all very much looking forward to the Halls opening in May 2011. 
“Everyone who is interested in following the development of the project through to completion can view progress and comment on the project on the Trust's new website at www.maryhillburghhalls.org.uk
Meanwhile, the contractor for the project Graham Construction is intending to maximise employment opportunities within the local community by creating two apprenticeships in joinery to work on the Halls’ restoration during the next few months
ends
Notes to Journalists: 
This news release is issued on behalf of Maryhill Burgh Halls Trust by Ross Wilson Public Relations www.rosswilsonpr.com - PR Consultants to the Trust. Further information is available from Ross Wilson on 07768 280021 at any time
e mail: ross@rosswilsonpr.com
A selection of images of the Halls are available. 

 

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UNVEILED! First glimpse of magnificent gates for Maryhill Burgh Halls


MAGNIFICENT new gates which will adorn the reborn Maryhill Burgh Halls were revealed for the first time this week.
The specially designed and produced gates will be an important feature of the Halls when their restoration is complete in around 16 months time.
They were commissioned by Maryhill Burgh Halls Trust which is overseeing the transformation of one of the city's much loved buildings into a vital community asset.  Funding for the gates has come from Glasgow City Council.

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Hats Off As Work Begins On Halls!

£9.2 million restoration of Maryhill Burgh Halls gets under way 
November 23 2009
HAT'S THE WAY TO DO IT....... MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF MARYHILL BURGH HALLS TRUST CELEBRATE THE FUNDRAISING TRIUMPH AND THE START OF WORK.
WORK to bring Maryhill's historic Burgh Halls back to life is officially under way.
Members of the Board of the Maryhill Burgh Halls Trust have now officially handed over the building to the contractors Graham Construction who will transform it into a vital community asset by May 2011.
The task was only made possible after a staggering £9.2 million was raised to fund the Project.

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Boost for Burgh Halls

European money pushes total to half of £9.2 million needed
May 25 2009 
MARYHILL'S historic Burgh Halls have received a new and massive cash injection as the drive to restore them gathers pace.
We can exclusively reveal that the Halls have been awarded £1.279 million from the European Regional Development Fund.
The money means that around £4.5 million in funding has been secured and work is on course to begin in September and be completed in early 2011. The total cost is £9.2 million.
The money which comes from the “Lowlands and Uplands Scotland 2007-2013 (European Structural Funds) Programme” is the THIRD major cash boost in just FIVE months. In JANUARY the Heritage Lottery Fund announced £990,000 while in APRIL, the BIG Lottery Fund promised £980,000.

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